2016 Year-End Tax Tips

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Below are some key points to consider as you weigh potential tax moves between now and the end of the year.

1) Set aside time to plan
Effective planning requires that you have a good understanding of your current tax situation, as well as a reasonable estimate of how your circumstances might change next year. There’s a real opportunity for tax savings if you’ll be paying taxes at a lower rate in one year than in the other. However, the window for most tax-saving moves closes on December 31, so don’t procrastinate.

2) Defer income to next year
Consider opportunities to defer income to 2017, particularly if you think you may be in a lower tax bracket then. For example, you may be able to defer a year-end bonus or delay the collection of business debts, rents and payments for services. Doing so may enable you to postpone payment of tax on the income until next year.

3) Accelerate deductions
You might also look for opportunities to accelerate deductions into the current tax year. If you itemize deductions, making payments for deductible expenses such as medical expenses, qualifying interest, and state taxes before the end of the year, instead of paying them in early 2017, could make a difference on your 2016 return.

4) Factor in the AMT
If you’re subject to the alternative minimum tax (AMT), traditional year-end maneuvers such as deferring income and accelerating deductions can have a negative effect. Essentially a separate federal income tax system with its own rates and rules, the AMT effectively disallows a number of itemized deductions.

5) Bump up withholding to cover a tax shortfall
If it looks as though you’re going to owe federal income tax for the year, especially if you think you may be subject to an estimated tax penalty, consider asking your employer (via Form W-4) to increase your withholding for the remainder of the year to cover the shortfall.

6) Maximize retirement savings
Deductible contributions to a traditional IRA and pretax contributions to an employer-sponsored retirement plan such as a 401(k) can reduce your 2016 taxable income. If you haven’t already contributed up to the maximum amount allowed, consider doing so by year-end.

7) Take any required distributions
Once you reach age 701/2, you generally must start taking required minimum distributions (RMDs) from traditional IRAs and employer-sponsored retirement plans. Take any distributions by the date required. The penalty for failing to do so is 50% of any amount you failed to distribute as required.

8) Weigh year-end investment moves
If you have realized net capital gains from selling securities at a profit, you might avoid being taxed on some or all of those gains by selling losing positions.

9) Beware the net investment income tax
Don’t forget to account for the 3.8% net investment income tax. This additional tax may apply to some or all of your net investment income if your modified AGI exceeds $200,000 ($250,000 if married filing jointly, $125,000 if married filing separately). 

Prepared by Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc. Copyright 2016.

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